Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Value of Business Experiments Part 3: Strategy and Alignment

In previous posts I have discussed the value proposition of business experiments from both a classical and behavioral economic perspective. This series of posts has been greatly influenced by Jim Manzi's book 'Uncontrolled: The Surprising Payoff of Trial-and-Error for Business, Politics, and Society.' Midway through the book Manzi highlights three important things that experiments in business can do:

1) They provide precision around the tactical implementation of strategy
2) They provide feedback on the performance of a strategy which allows for refinements to be driven by evidence
3) They help achieve organizational and strategic alignment

Manzi explains that within any corporation there are always silos and subcultures advocating competing strategies with perverse incentives and agendas in pursuit of power and control. How do we know who is right and which programs or ideas are successful considering the many factors that could be influencing any outcome of interest? Manzi describes any environment where the number of causes of variation are enormous as an environment that has 'high causal density.' We can claim to address this with a data driven culture, but what does that mean? Modern companies in a digital age with AI and big data are drowning in data. This makes it easy to adorn rhetoric in advanced analytical frameworks. Because data seldom speaks, anyone can speak for the data through wily data story telling.

As Jim Manzi and Stefan Thomke discuss in Harvard Business Review:

"business experiments can allow companies to look beyond correlation and investigate causality....Without it, executives have only a fragmentary understanding of their businesses, and the decisions they make can easily backfire."

In complex environments with high causal density, we don't know enough about the nature and causes of human behavior, decisions, and causal paths from actions to outcomes to list them all and measure and account for them even if we could agree how to measure them. This is the nature of decision making under uncertainty. But, as R.A. Fisher taught us with his agricultural experiments, randomized tests allow us to account for all of these hidden factors (Manzi calls them hidden conditionals). Only then does our data stand a chance to speak truth.

Having causal knowledge helps identify more informed and calculated risks vs. risks taken on the basis of gut instinct, political motivation, or overly optimistic data-driven correlational pattern finding analytics.

Experiments add incremental knowledge and value to business. No single experiment is going to be a 'killer app' that by itself will generate millions in profits. But in aggregate the knowledge created by experiments probably offers the greatest strategic value across an enterprise compared to any other analytic method.

As Luke Froeb writes in Managerial Economics, A Problem Solving Approach (3rd Edition):

"With the benefit of hindsight, it is easy to identify successful strategies (and the reasons for their success) or failed strategies (and the reason for their failures). Its much more difficult to identify successful or failed strategies before they succeed or fail."

Business experiments offer the opportunity to test strategies early on a smaller scale to get causal feedback about potential success or failure before fully committing large amounts of irrecoverable resources. This takes the concept of failing fast to a whole new level.

Achieving the greatest value from business experiments requires leadership commitment.  It also demands a culture that is genuinely open to learning through a blend of trial and error, data driven decision making, and the infrastructure necessary for implementing enough tests and iterations to generate the knowledge necessary for rapid learning and innovation. The result is a corporate culture that allows an organization to formulate, implement, and modify strategy faster and more tactfully than others.

See also:
The Value of Business Experiments: The Knowledge Problem
The Value of Business Experiments Part 2: A Behavioral Economics Perspective
Statistics is a Way of Thinking, Not a Box of Tools

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